1. serious-casebook:

    image

    This seems to me a most horrifying coming-of-age story.

    Being around Dorian Gray’s age when he was first introduced in the story, I readily stepped into his mind and childish character. Youthfulness make us dream of most unsuitable things. We thought ourselves romantic. We wish to be adventurous. In this wild fancy we so often disregard the consequences.

    For Dorian Gray, his portrait took the burden of sin for him. Deep down, I would envy him, except his fate had proven to be more dreadful than fortunate. For us, fated to be scarred by age and our wrong-doings, have been warned. It seems that fear of these scars can save us.

    Still, it makes me shudder to think that one can so easily lose one’s virtues. How can one choose the right path and not go astray? A sudden strike of fancy for danger, the desires to be extraordinary, or a moment of crazed temper…. Can we ever save ourselves from such menace?

    This unhappy story has seemly planted a deep dread. It is so good it pierced my heart and left it groaning and moaning. Even though it has become one of my all time favorites. It has touched me so deeply that I wish never to visit it again. The only consolation is that it has served to caution me against romanticizing rackless evil. I pray that I am thus saved from a lifetime’s worth of foolishness.

     
  2.  
  3. smartgirlsattheparty:

greatestgeneration:


A welder at a boat-and-sub-building yard adjusts her goggles before resuming work, October, 1943. By 1945, women comprised well over a third of the civilian labor force (in 1940, it was closer to a quarter) and millions of those jobs were filled in factories: building bombers, manufacturing munitions, welding, drilling and riveting for the war effort.

Bernard Hoffma—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
Read more: http://life.time.com/history/world-war-ii-classic-photos-from-the-20th-centurys-defining-conflict/#ixzz2ga3Kp0mp

    smartgirlsattheparty:

    greatestgeneration:

    A welder at a boat-and-sub-building yard adjusts her goggles before resuming work, October, 1943. By 1945, women comprised well over a third of the civilian labor force (in 1940, it was closer to a quarter) and millions of those jobs were filled in factories: building bombers, manufacturing munitions, welding, drilling and riveting for the war effort.

     
  4.  
  5. serious-casebook:

    10+ years ago I was a little girl too young to feel comfortable reading a huge hardcover book, but somehow the title and the cover art has stayed with me. Somewhere at the back of my mind I always planed to get back to this book.

    10+ years later, I realized I’m still a little girl who’d blush and cringe at every rude joke in the book. Even so, I fully enjoyed the story. Mythology, be it Egyptian, Greek, Norse, or Asian, interests me. Yet one does this book no justice to say it is a book about ancient mythical beings—not to me at least. I love the twists and turns of a mystery, the thrill of adventure, and touches of humanity here and there. “American Gods” has it all.

    Reading it was like savoring good wine—over the course of several days. The tastes keep changing. And there is always some kind of aftertaste that lasts through the night, making you dream weird dreams and wake up feeling funny. But guess what? I like that.

    Because it feels real.

    image

     
  6. Nothing’s more appalling than a self-proclaimed gentleman.

    It’s incredible, hearing someone say, “I’m a gentleman.” And usually in the first few hours of meeting people (Yes, that has happened, many times.) How vain are you? Even more amazing, they followed up the conversation what “they” think is proper lady-like behavior. And then reasoned that a woman should behave around him because he is “clearly” being a good man. They carry themselves as if they are heaven’s gift to women. Ugh! 

    Excuse me, but giving yourself a nice label proves nothing. It is the actions that counts. Having expectations on people’s behaviors is such a rude thing to do. Why not drop the labels and let your actions speak for yourself?

    People are not blind. If there is goodness in a person, they see. A person who is genuine have no fear of being overlooked. In the end, shouldn’t we focus more on being nice to people, respecting each other, and communicating?

    P.S. Even more sicking is how they say I’m being unreasonable when I want to leave. Isn’t it better just to let me pardon myself and so you can meet people more your class? But no, you insist on feeling offended and calling me names. What was that? I should give a proper reason? Why, I’m sorry I didn’t realize you are my parents.

    Sorry people for the negativity, I’m so overwhelmed with things some guys say to me over the past year I just have to let it out. Hopefully this doesn’t make me an unkind person. Really, there are lots of wonderful people out there, and I love to meet, talk, dance, and have fun together. But to do that sometimes one has to take the chance and talk to strangers, and then meeting bad people is inevitable.

     
  7. “The modern view [that it is bad for adults to read fairy tales / children’s books] seems to me to involve a false conception of growth. They accuse us of arrested development because we have not lost a taste we had in childhood. But surely arrested development consists not in refusing to lose old things but in failing to add new things? I now like hock, which I am sure I should not have liked as a child. But I still like lemon-squash. I call this growth or development because I have been enriched: where I formerly had only one pleasure, I now have two. But if I had to lose the taste for lemon-squash before I acquired the taste for hock, that would not be growth but simple change.

    I now enjoy Tolstoy and Jane Austen and Trollope as well as fairy tales and I call that growth: if I had had to lose the fairy tales in order to acquire the novelists, I would not say that I had grown but only that I had changed. A tree grows because it adds rings: a train doesn’t grow by leaving one station behind and puffing on to the next. In reality, the case is stronger and more complicated than this. I think my growth is just as apparent when I now read the fairy tales as when I read the novelists, for I now enjoy the fairy tales better than I did in childhood: being now able to put more in, of course I get more out.”

    C. S. Lewis, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children” (via dduane)

    Thank you!!

     
  8. Have you heard of “bookcrossing”? (Hint: It is an actual word!!)

    Anyway, I learned about this website when documenting my reading progress on Goodreads (which is another cool website!). Bookcrossing.com let readers like you and me keep track of our books by giving them unique IDs. We can then leave them out in public places or lend them to friends so that more people can enjoy them. I find this the most exciting idea!

    I just got a BCID for one of my books today, and is still thinking about where and when to release it. Already I am feeling incredibly excited.

     
  9. “Losing your objectivity almost always means losing the game.”

    Bronstein (via enpasant)

    I play chess. I’d like to think I play my life too. I am pretty convinced that life is just one big game. (At least, this sounds more interesting than: I live a life. Nothing wrong with that, anyhow.)

     
  10. 09:32 8th Jun, 2014

    Notes: 1391

    Reblogged from engrprof

    Tags: #humor#jokes#chemistry


       reblog

    shychemist:

mistermajik2000:

unbearable chemistry joke

Fave.

If I had this years ago my chemistry wouldn’t be half as bad.

    shychemist:

    mistermajik2000:

    unbearable chemistry joke

    Fave.

    If I had this years ago my chemistry wouldn’t be half as bad.

     
  11. “Don’t be afraid of losing, be afraid of playing a game and not learning something.”
    Dan Heisman (via enpasant)
     
  12. jtotheizzoe:

    Richard Feynman explains the scientific method, from his 1964 lectures at Cornell

    "If it disagrees with experiment, it’s wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science."

     
  13. thekidshouldseethis:

    This has never been done before: the European Space Agency (ESA) is about to land a spacecraft onto the surface of a comet. Launched in 2004, the Rosetta spacecraft will reach 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014, and will attach its Philae robotic lander to it during the following November.

    The spacecraft’s mission is to study the comet at close-range as it transforms from a quiet nugget of ice and rock, frozen solid by years spent in deep space, to a sun-warmed dynamo spewing jets of gas and dust into a magnificently evolving tail…

    "A flyby is just a tantalizing glimpse of a comet at one stage in its evolution," points out (project scientist Claudia) Alexander. "Rosetta is different. It will orbit 67P for 17 months. We’ll see this comet evolve right before our eyes as we accompany it toward the sun and back out again."

    Because a comet has little gravity, the lander will anchor itself with harpoons. “The feet may drill into something crunchy like permafrost, or maybe into something rock solid,” Alexander speculates.

    Once it is fastened, the lander will commence an unprecedented first-hand study of a comet’s nucleus while Rosetta continues to monitor developments overhead.

    In the archives: What makes up a comet?

    via diy.

     
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  15. 19:54 11th May, 2014

    Notes: 12244

    Reblogged from engrprof

    Tags: #you are amazing#love books


       reblog

    bikiniblast:

    bikiniblast:

    Everyone who reblogs this will get the title of a book to read based on their bio/posts.
    Everyone. I mean it.

    I’ve done everyone who’s reblogged so far🌸

    (Source: martiniflirt)